This week we see a cluster of stories that show God making the impossible possible. Whether it’s life out of LectioCastdeath or a transformation of a violent aggressor into a vessel of self-giving love, God has the power to create and renew and rejuvenate. 

1 Kings 17:8-16, (17-24) The places and ways that God works can and do and should surprise us—that is, if our God is in fact the Lord over all things. What does it take to see and know that God is the true God?

Psalm 146 God is creator and helper and sovereign. This is a good reminder that we shouldn’t put our hope and trust in human rulers—maybe an especially good place to focus during an election cycle in the U.S. 

Galatians 1:11-24 Paul’s cocky—but maybe for good reason. And Daniel goes strong with a claim that Paul is converted no the Road to Damascus—but maybe not in the way we usually think.

Luke 7:11-17 Jesus replays the Elijah story. And God gets the glory through God’s prophet. Again.

Make sure you grab your tickets to Wild Goose Festival in Hot Springs, North Carolina on July 7-10! We’ll be recording and I’d love to meet more LectioCastians.

img_4587-e1423264085676 Bryan Berghoef is a pastor, writer, and pub theologian, and author of the book, Pub Theology: Beer, Conversation, and God.  He insists that good things happen when we sit around the table together and talk about things that matter, and what better setting than at the pub, over a pint? Bryan has been facilitating weekly pub conversations for the past eight years in Michigan and Washington DC. Bryan hosts a weekly podcast, Pub Theology Live, and provides resources for Pub Theology groups at pubtheology.com.

Daniel Kirk is a writer, speaker, blogger, and New Testament professor who lives in San Francisco, CA. He danielkirkholds a Ph.D. in New Testament from Duke University and is the author of a pair of books, Unlocking Romans: Resurrection and the Justification of God and Jesus Have I Loved, but Paul? His third book A Man Attested by God: the Human Jesus of the Synoptic Gospels, is off to the printers. He blogs regularly at StoriedTheology.com  (http://patheos.com/blogs/storiedtheology). You can follow him on Twitter @jrdkirk and on Facebook at Facebook.com/jrdkirk.

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